This is a very wise young woman

This morning, my partner pointed me towards the valedictorian speech given by Erica Goldson at Coxsackie-Athens High School in upstate New York. It is among the more insightful and heart-wrenching pieces of writing on education I’ve seen, and it deserves to be read by everyone. I’d like to reprint it in full, but I want her permission first. Meanwhile, you can read it here, and I will quote two of my favorite parts.

Erica writes:

I am now accomplishing that goal [getting out of high school as soon as possible]. I am graduating. I should look at this as a positive experience, especially being at the top of my class. However, in retrospect, I cannot say that I am any more intelligent than my peers. I can attest that I am only the best at doing what I am told and working the system. Yet, here I stand, and I am supposed to be proud that I have completed this period of indoctrination. I will leave in the fall to go on to the next phase expected of me, in order to receive a paper document that certifies that I am capable of work. But I contest that I am a human being, a thinker, an adventurer – not a worker. A worker is someone who is trapped within repetition – a slave of the system set up before him. But now, I have successfully shown that I was the best slave. I did what I was told to the extreme. While others sat in class and doodled to later become great artists, I sat in class to take notes and become a great test-taker. While others would come to class without their homework done because they were reading about an interest of theirs, I never missed an assignment. While others were creating music and writing lyrics, I decided to do extra credit, even though I never needed it. So, I wonder, why did I even want this position? Sure, I earned it, but what will come of it? When I leave educational institutionalism, will I be successful or forever lost? I have no clue about what I want to do with my life; I have no interests because I saw every subject of study as work, and I excelled at every subject just for the purpose of excelling, not learning. And quite frankly, now I’m scared.

I can’t say whether she is more intelligent than her peers, though she is certainly more thoughtful than most. Also, I happen to think that she would make a great Montessori teacher, but I’m not biased or anything!

She also writes:

And now here I am in a world guided by fear, a world suppressing the uniqueness that lies inside each of us, a world where we can either acquiesce to the inhuman nonsense of corporatism and materialism or insist on change. We are not enlivened by an educational system that clandestinely sets us up for jobs that could be automated, for work that need not be done, for enslavement without fervency for meaningful achievement. We have no choices in life when money is our motivational force. Our motivational force ought to be passion, but this is lost from the moment we step into a system that trains us, rather than inspires us.

I don’t have much of anything to add to that. She is exactly right.

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